Thursday, October 04, 2007

Interesting development in Howell Schools

A very interesting development in going on with Howell Schools. I haven't followed it as closely lately since I moved out of the district and am less active in the Concerned Taxpayers Group.

Mary Jo Dymond resigned from her position, leaving a vacancy. One of the individuals who wants to replace her - Livingston Organization of Values in Education (LOVE-PAC) founder Vicki Fyke.

From the Argus

Vicki Fyke has filed an application to be considered for the seat on the Howell Public Schools Board of Education left vacant by the recent resignation of Mary Jo Dymond.

Fyke is the controversial leader of LOVE (Livingston Organization for Values in Education) who has challenged the school district on a number of issues, from a diversity flag to novels read in an advanced-placement English class.

Fyke is among seven hopefuls for the seat who've made their interest known thus far. The deadline for filing is 3 p.m. Friday


Stop at Cleary's for a beer before going to this meeting. The tension will be in the air.

2 comments:

Communications guru said...

Just what Howell needs: the leader of an anti-gay hate group on the school board. Didn’t the county get enough of a black eye when they gave racist hatemonger Ann Coulter a standing ovation and more than $30,000?

Stevencap said...

Does Your Candidate Have Plan to Save U.S. Manufacturing?

For the October 9 Republican debate in Dearborn, the Alliance for American Manufacturing (AAM) urges Michigan voters to challenge their presidential candidates regarding America’s manufacturing crisis.

The United States racked up a $763 billion trade deficit in 2006, and more than 40,000 U.S. factories have closed since 2000. Michigan has lost more than 279,000 manufacturing employees. These lost factories, and our enormous trade deficit, do not happen by accident. U.S. manufacturers face ongoing, unfair competition from overseas. For example, China employs currency manipulation—a practice deemed illegal under international law—to artificially lower the cost of their goods while raising the price of U.S. exports. China also dumps product in the U.S. and illegally subsidizes its manufacturing. In the past five years alone, China’s state-run economy has poured $52 billion into its steel production, a serious challenge to private American steel producers.

We believe it’s high time that our presidential candidates address this illegal competition confronting American businesses, and offer concrete solutions about how to strengthen U.S. manufacturing.

At the Dearborn debate, and elsewhere, ask your candidates to explain how they’ll stand up for American manufacturing. Ask them directly:
1. What specific policies will you support to strengthen the American manufacturing base, which is vital to our economic and national security?
2. What steps will you take to enforce our trade laws and hold cheating countries like China accountable?

These are serious questions—ones that deserve forthright answers.

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