Friday, June 18, 2010

Pete Hoekstra repeats his support for a tax increase

With the primary coming up, it helps to bring this back from the archives. Hoekstra came out for his tax increase around March 20th.

From the Observor and Eccentric in Royal Oak


The 57-year-old congressman from Holland told members of the Royal Oak Chamber of Commerce Wednesday that increased sales taxes would “totally eliminate some other taxes.” Specifically, he mentioned the small business and personal property taxes, both of which he said are hurting businesses in the state.
“My preference is to spread the sales tax over a broader base and to raise the rate,” Hoekstra said in response to a question. “There is no perfect tax system.”
Currently the state’s 6 percent sales tax does not apply to groceries and medication.

This isn't a secret. It's downplayed, but no secret, and it is probably a good reason that Hoekstra didn't get the Michigan Chamber endorsement. It's also a big reason why I'm supporting Mike Cox as the best alternative to the beltwayitis of Hoekstra.


I don't like the small business or personal property tax, but this small business owner is KILLED with a services tax.  Absolutely killed. Reduce the business taxes, yes, but don't KILL the services industry with a tax increase. Cut the damn spending.

I stand by what I wrote the 20th.

As I posted on March 20th:


We all know Andy Dillon supports higher taxes, but I'm a little disappointed in Hoekstra. He was until this my second choice for governor, and one where I wouldn't have to hold my nose in supporting outside of that one bailout vote that left me a bit sour. Well, now the bailout vote isn't the only thing that has me sour.

From the Detroit News


Beverly Hills -- Two early poll leaders in the Michigan governor's race -- Democrat Andy Dillon and Republican Pete Hoekstra -- found more common ground than differences Friday in a rare joint appearance at Detroit Country Day School.
They agreed term limits block political relationships in Lansing; it takes too long for businesses to get regulatory permits; right-to-work legislation would be too divisive; and the state needs to retool its tax system, including extending the sales tax to services.



This one pisses me off. It's personal.

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